Tag Archives: vietnam

Vietnam #18: Highlights and Lowlights

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An
Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue
Vietnam #11: Exploring Hanoi
Vietnam #12: Hanoi Hilton
Vietnam #13: The Best View in Hanoi
Vietnam #14: Sheraton Hanoi Hotel
Vietnam #15: Need a Reason to Go to Vietnam: Here it Is.
Vietnam #16: How to Pick a Ha Long Bay Cruise
Vietnam #17: Panorama Vietnam

Highlights:

1) Hoi An. I fell in love with the charming ancient town of Hoi An in central Vietnam and its many colorful lanterns. Before I started researching Vietnam, I never even heard of Hoi An. Now, I’m so glad I did.

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2) Ha Long Bay. The beautiful limestone karsts of Ha Long Bay are one of the major reasons people come to Vietnam. And they lived up to their reputation. Our five-star luxury cruise was icing on the cake.

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3) Cheap! Vietnam is dirty cheap. After Scotland, it was so nice to be able to enjoy the finer things in life without worrying what the bill was going to look like. Case in point: We took a three hour taxi ride from Danang to Hue, and it only cost us $50 for two people.

4) Vietnamese children. I have a bit of an obsession with taking pictures of children when I travel. The children in Vietnam were friendly and loved seeing their faces on my LCD screen. That’s what I call a win-win.

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5) Hotels. Hotel points go far in Asia. Our amazing apartment suite in Ho Chi Minh City was only 25,000 IHG points a night. Our beach resort in Danang was only 12,000 Hyatt points a night. Living it up in the lap of luxury made our trip that much better.

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6) Warm weather. I hate winter. I love summer. Vietnam was warm. End of story.

7) History. Vietnam is filled with history. It was fascinating to see the events I read about in high school and college up-close.

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Lowlights:

1) Hives. I’m not going to lie. Breaking out in random hives halfway around the globe was a bit worrisome. Thankfully, a painless trip to a local clinic helped tremendously.

2) Hue. The ancient capital of Hue is a must-hit in the tourist books, but Lisa and I were underwhelmed. It could have been an off-day, or the heat, but we both felt like we could have skipped it.

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3) Working out. Or the lack thereof. Every vacation, I promise myself to use the hotel gym or make time for yoga. And every vacation i fail miserably.

4) Jet lag. As was to be expected, the jet leg on the return trip was a killer. Enough to make me swear off Asia for a while.

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All in all, I loved Vietnam. Before we left, I read many blog posts about people hating Vietnam, especially in comparison to other southeast Asian countries. I loved Cambodia, but I can now also say that I loved Vietnam. I highly recommend it.

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Part # 17: Panorama Vietnam

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An
Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue
Vietnam #11: Exploring Hanoi
Vietnam #12: Hanoi Hilton
Vietnam #13: The Best View in Hanoi
Vietnam #14: Sheraton Hanoi Hotel
Vietnam #15: Need a Reason to Go to Vietnam: Here it Is.
Vietnam #16: How to Pick a Ha Long Bay Cruise

While I love taking and posting my own pictures, I don’t have a panorama option on my DSLR. Thankfully, Lisa’s camera does, and she loves taking panoramic shots. She does a great job, and it’s a neat way to get a feel for this fascinating country.

Thanks Lisa!

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A row of motorbikes in Ho Chi Minh City

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A row of shops in central Ho Chi Minh City

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The beach at our Hyatt hotel in Danang

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Fishing boats in the Hoi An countryside

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Lang Co Bay en route to Hue

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A street corner in Hanoi

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Sitting on a tree in Hanoi overlooking Hoan Kiem Lake

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The stunning and incomparable Ha Long Bay





 

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Vietnam #16: How to Pick a Ha Long Bay Cruise

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An
Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue
Vietnam #11: Exploring Hanoi
Vietnam #12: Hanoi Hilton
Vietnam #13: The Best View in Hanoi
Vietnam #14: Sheraton Hanoi Hotel
Vietnam #15: Need a Reason to Go to Vietnam: Here it Is.

How to pick a Ha Long Bay cruise? Great question.

We spent months googling “best ha long bay cruise.” There are hundreds of cruise options, ranging from low-budget to the height of luxury. Every blog/article/review more or less said the same thing: You get what you pay for.

So we decided to pay a little bit more. We made a conscious decision to skip the low-budget backpacker option. While it’s possible to do a day tour of Ha Long Bay, it’s not advisable. It takes a good three to four hours to get from Hanoi to the port. The most common tours are one night or two. We chose a two day/one night tour.

After extensive research, we settled on Indochina Junk, which is described as a luxury cruise. We were specifically drawn to them because they operate exclusively in Bai Tu Long Bay – away from the hundreds of other junkets. Indochina Junk offers a couple of options. We chose the Dragon Legend, a 24 cabin boat with a maximum of 46 passengers for $219 per person. This price included transportation, lodging, four meals, and activities.

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Our itinerary

I won’t mince words. We LOVED it. Of course, it didn’t it hurt that the view was absolutely stunning. But it sure was nice to enjoy the limestone karsts from the luxury of a five-star cruise.

Our “luxury van” picked us up at our Hanoi hotel Sunday morning at 8 a.m., and I’m happy to report that it was rather luxurious – especially the wifi.

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Four hours later, we pulled up to the port and boarded a small transfer boat. And then, finally, finally, we boarded our cruise ship.

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The ship was extremely comfortable, with nice bedrooms, a lovely deck, lavish meals, and a very affordable spa. Our guide was friendly, and we loved having the bay to ourselves.

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And of course, here is our mind-blowing, breath-stealing view:

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We had an amazing time. Ha Long Bay is truly beautiful, and the Dragon Legend made the trip that much more enjoyable. I’m not surprised the cruise ranks number five on TripAdvisor. If you’re confused by the array of tour options, and you’re willing to spend a little extra, I highly recommend the Dragon Legend.

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Vietnam #15: Need a Reason to Go to Vietnam? Here It Is.

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An
Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue
Vietnam #11: Exploring Hanoi
Vietnam #12: Hanoi Hilton
Vietnam #13: The Best View in Hanoi
Vietnam #14: Sheraton Hanoi Hotel

I knew Ha Long Bay was going to be pretty. But I did not expect it to take my breath away. And I did not expect the expression “take my breath away” to be quite so literal.

I now know why Ha Long Bay is a “must see” on all the traveling lists. It is beautiful in a way you can’t fully appreciate until you see it with your own eyes. So if you’re looking for a reason to go to Vietnam – here it is. Ha Long Bay. Don’t skip it. It is amazing, and I readily acknowledge that “amazing” doesn’t do it justice.

We were lucky. After a couple of days of rain, we woke up Sunday morning to sunny blue skies and 70 degree weather. We also chose our cruise company (more on that later) specifically because it took us to an isolated part of the bay, far away from the traffic jam of tourist cruises you so often see in pictures. This meant we had the unique karsts all to ourselves.

Warning: There is an absurd amount of pictures below. It is not my fault. I plead temporary insanity on account of the natural beauty.

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We spent some time sitting on the deck and doing absolutely nothing. Just basking in the afternoon sun and screeching with glee.

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And then we took – you guessed it – more pictures.

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I even took a video.

A Taste of Ha Long Bay from Nam Writes on Vimeo.

In the afternoon, we took out the kayaks for a a tour around the bay. It took Lisa and I a while to develop a rhythm, but soon, we were speeding along. Ha Long Bay is definitely the most beautiful place I’ve ever kayaked.

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I’m fairly certain we look like Olympic kayakers here.

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I think the technical term for this pose is called “killing it.”

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As the sun set into the water, the ship anchored for the night, and we enjoyed the colorful sky.

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The next morning we woke up at the crack of dawn – literally – to watch the sunrise. After shivering for a bit, the cold morning gave way to the warmth of the sun.

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After breakfast, we hopped over to a nearby island to visit an underground cave and relax on the beach.

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Lisa and I on the passenger boat en route to the island

We spent fifteen minutes exploring the cave.

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And then enjoyed some beautiful views while we dipped our toes in the sand.

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Our cruise ship anchored in the distance.

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Lisa is never happier than she is on/in the water.

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After that, it was time to head back to the mainland. Lisa and I were exhausted and headed straight for the airport for our flight home. But what a way to end our Vietnam trip. If you need a reason to go to Vietnam, it doesn’t get better than Ha Long Bay.

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Vietnam #14: Sheraton Hanoi Hotel

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An
Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue
Vietnam #11: Exploring Hanoi
Vietnam #12: Hanoi Hilton
Vietnam #13: The Best View in Hanoi

We opted to stay at the Sheraton Hanoi Hotel, located on the edge of West Lake, Hanoi’s largest lake. The Sheraton cost a mere 3,000 – 3,500 points a night. The northern location is a 45 minute walk or 15 minute drive from the Old Quarter, but the Sheraton offers a complimentary shuttle into town (but not back to the hotel), and taxis are so cheap that it wasn’t an issue.

Sheraton Hanoi map

The decor in rather dated, and I was surprised to find out the hotel was only 10 years old.

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The best part of the hotel though is the Sheraton club room. Although I have no SPG status, the SPG business credit card gives me access to all Sheraton club rooms. It may seem like a silly thing to get excited about, but after nearly two weeks of traveling, it was a pleasure to have constant access to water, diet coke, and fresh fruit, not to mention other snacks. Of course, the views didn’t hurt either.

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Vietnam #13: The Best View in Hanoi

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An
Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue
Vietnam #11: Exploring Hanoi
Vietnam #12: Hanoi Hilton

Top of Hanoi is a rooftop bar on the 65th floor of the Lotte Center in Hanoi. The rooftop is hip and modern and provides heaters and blankets to counter the nighttime chill. Entrance is free, but the menu prices are almost as high as the view.

But totally worth it.

Walking out of the elevator, you walk down a long, dark corridor, designed to give you the impression of entering another time and place.

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The north side offers views of West Lake.

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The south side offers views of central Hanoi.

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Vietnam #12: The Hanoi Hilton

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An
Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue
Vietnam #11: Exploring Hanoi

There was one thing I really wanted to see in Hanoi: The Hanoi Hilton. No, I’m not talking about a hotel. The Hanoi Hilton was the name given to Hoa Lo Prison, the prison used by the French colonialists against the Vietnamese, and later, by the North Vietnam to imprison American POWs during the Vietnam War. As an avid politico, I had read all about the Hanoi Hilton. I was desperate to see it in person.

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Hoa Lo means literally “fiery furnace,” derived from the prison’s location among a concentration of stores selling stoves. It is also an apt name given the prison’s horrific conditions.

The museum is small with exhibits occupying its modest two floors, all of which emphasize a central message: The French colonialists cruelly massacred the Vietnamese prisoners while the Vietnamese treated American POWs with kindness and generosity. I am not being facetious. Like most of the museums we saw in the south, Hoa Lo Prison is an exercise in Vietnamese propaganda at its best.

We entered Cell D first, “the largest cells of Hoa Lo Prison where the French colony kept male prisoners…It was this same cell that the French used to detain many revolutionary Vietnam soldiers. These soldiers subsequently became senior executives of the Communist Party of Vietnam and Government of Vietnam…”

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Cachot is a tiny prison room at the far end of the first floor. Acording to the sign, Cachot was “used to confine prisoners who broke the regulations of the prison. Cachot in Hoa Lo was ‘hell of the hell,’ dungeon was dark and narrow. Prisoners were kept seperatelly, put in stocks, and to eat and relieve themselves on the spot. All the prisoners confined here were puffed with oedema, their eyes were clouded over and their bodies were covered with scabies caused by the lack of light and air.” [Spelling is not my own.]

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Some exhibits demonstrate the lengths the Vietnamese went to escape.

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Outside, a memorial honors the “struggle against enemy’s terrorism” and efforts to turn “the prison into a school to propagate the revolutionary argument.”

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*2015-12-03 10.09.57We then moved on to the Vietnam War era. A sign offers context: “The United States government carried out sabotage warfare by using their air and naval forces against the North Vietnamese from 05 August 1964 to 15 January 1973… Some of pictures and objects in these two exhibition halls show details of US pilots’ lifes when they were temporary imprisoned at Hoa Lo prison.” [Spelling is not my own.]

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These were the beds used by American POWs.

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Here I am sitting in a prison cell. It’s not particularly comfortable.

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Hoa Lo’s most famous POW was Senator John McCain, a U.S. senator from Arizona and the Republican presidential nominee in 2008. He was captured in 1967 when his plane was shot down over North Vietnam. Contrary to the propaganda in the museum, McCain was put in solitary confinement and severely tortured. Today, he can’t lift either of his arms above his shoulders. He can’t comb his own hair. Here is a photo of his capture.

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U.S. POWs, including John McCain, pictured at their release in 1973.

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The museum paints a very rosy picture – almost hysterically so – of the conditions in Hoa Lo during the Vietnam War.

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Christmas meal for the American pilots in prison

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The American pilots held a Christmas ceremony in the prison

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Army doctors treated a wound for John McCain an American pilot arrested at Truc Bach Lake – Hanoi on 26 October 1967.

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American pilots play billiards

While I obviously didn’t buy into the propaganda machine, it is fascinating to see the historical pictures and the tale that is still being woven today by the Vietnamese government, more than 40 years after the war ended.

 

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Vietnam #11: Exploring Hanoi

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An
Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue

Hanoi is not what I’d call a pretty city. It has its elegant moments, but for the most part, it is gritty, noisy, intense, and overwhelming. Especially the Old Quarter.

We didn’t have a particular destination in mind. We simply wandered through the Old Quarter’s byzantine streets, turning randomly as we desperately avoided oncoming traffic. Literally. See the evidence below.

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I already warned you about the traffic in Ho Chi Minh City. If it’s possible, the traffic is even worse in Hanoi’s Old Quarter. This is one of my favorite pictures. I can’t even begin to imagine riding a motorbike with two people and a stack of steel beams!

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The Old Quarter is made up of overcrowded streets, tiny shops and homes that look like they’ve seen better days, overhanging electrical wires, crazy trees, and piles of cheap crap for sale.

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This seems like a great way to save money on rent.

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You can buy a Vietnamese hat for any sized head. Seriously, any size.

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Or a banana – ripe or unripe.

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Or any color zipper you’d like.

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Or a painting.

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In fact, Lisa did!

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After the Old Quarter we headed south to Hoan Kiem Lake, a picturesque reprieve in busy Hanoi.

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Vietnam #10: A Hot Day in Hue

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam
Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An

All the guide books say Hue is a must-see city. Hue (pronounced Hwhay) was the capital city of the Nguyen dynasty from 1802 until 1945 when the communist government was established in Hanoi. Hue’s ancient complex is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Located on the banks of the Perfume River, the walled city boasts palaces, shrines, and other monuments.

Getting to Hue is not that difficult. You can take the train for a pittance, but we took a taxi for the three hour drive north from Danang. That may sound expensive, but the three hour door-to-door drive cost all of 50 U.S. dollars or 25 dollars per person. That’s the equivalent of a 20 minute cab ride in D.C. The taxi was extremely comfortable, and we had the added benefit of stopping for pictures along the way.

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The ancient capital is pretty, but the intense heat sucked all of our energy. After walking all over southern Vietnam, we thought we could easily manage the 25 minute walk from our hotel to the ancient city. Wrong. We quickly gave in to the insistent pedicab drivers hawking their services. Note: The pedicab is really not meant for multiple people…We could not stop laughing.

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After we left the ancient complex, we passed a display of old military vehicles. The explanations were the best part.

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“57MM anti-aircraft artillery of the liberation army used during the liberation campaign in Thua Thien Hue in the spring of 1975.”

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“The MIG-21 is a fighting jet-plane of Vietnam military aviation. In the resistance against American imperialists from 1954 to 1975. Vietnam military aviation used this type of jet-plane to shoot down he enemy aircrafts, especially B-52 flying fortress of American imperialists.”

Now, for my absolute favorite part of the day. Ancient ruins are nice and all, but nothing makes me happier than taking pictures of local children. I know, I know, it’s weird – this obsession of mine. But look how cute these kids are.

The young boy loved playing with my camera so much, I couldn’t take any pictures. So I gave him my iPhone to play with, and he was ecstatic.

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Vietnam #9: Don’t Skip Hoi An

Vietnam #1: It’s a Long Ass Flight to Vietnam
Vietnam #2: The Best Hotel in Ho Chi Minh City
Vietnam #3: A Lesson in History and Propaganda
Vietnam #4: The Streets of HCMC
Vietnam #5: Is the Mekong Delta Worth It?
Vietnam #6: My First Overseas Doctor Visit
Vietnam #7: Welcome to Central Vietnam
Vietnam #8: Two-Wheeling in Vietnam

I fell in love with Hoi An the only way I know how to fall in love: Hard and quick.

Hoi An during the day is a charming ancient town, filled with little shops, restaurants, and sprawling markets. Hoi An at night is transformed by the hundreds (thousands?) of colored lanterns lighting up its streets. It is a city ablaze with light and color, and it drew me in. I was in love. Who needs a boyfriend when I had charming Hoi An? .

We made two trips to Hoi An, so we got to see Hoi An at night twice – which is really the best part. If you only have time for a couple of hours in Hoi An, make sure it’s after the sun has set.

Let me warn you: There will be a shit ton of pictures of lanterns, but they were so incredibly beautiful. I couldn’t stop snapping. There is something ineffable about the colorful light piercing the darkness of the night that speaks to me. It reminds me of one of my favorite songs: “Where there’s shadow there is light, love is in the battle cry, even in the darkest night, there is shadow and there is light.”

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A little tripod action here. That blurry person in the red shirt is Lisa.

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It wouldn’t be Vietnam if there weren’t vendors hawking lanterns and other items. Idiot that I am, it took me a while to realize that the Vietnamese women had an agenda every time they told me how beautiful my hair was. I truly thought I had the most beautiful hair South Asia had ever seen. These women were much more successful with Lisa, who bought two lanterns, two tailored-made skirts, and one dress. Apparently, Hoi An is known for its silk and tailoring as much as it’s known for its lanterns.

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Lisa holding one of her tailored-made purchases

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Lisa picks out her second lantern

At night, you can also buy floating paper candles for one dollar. For 150,00 dong ($6.65 USD), we climbed into a rickety boat while a woman ferried us down the Thu Bon River. After a pleasant ride, we set our candles on the water along with hundreds of others. According to Vietnamese lore, this is supposed to be bring us good luck. I’m still waiting for that to kick in.

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Our intrepid rower. The funniest/scariest moment came when she led us underneath a small bridge and gestured for us to lay down, lest we lose our heads. Lisa and I flattened ourselves as we floated just inches away from the underbelly of the bridge. Cue a mix of hysterical and nervous laughter.

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Our one dollar paper candles. Where is our good luck?!?

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An array of candles for sale

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During the day, we walked around to the different stores, took pictures of locals, and relaxed in a coffee shop for a bit. It gets rather hot during the day, so taking it slowly and relaxing is not a bad idea.

The ancient town is a pedestrian only area (bike are allowed), making it the perfect place for strolling, people watching, and picture taking. The town is made up of charming streets and decrepit alleyways perfect for exploring.

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Our first stop of the day was this lantern shop where Lisa bought her first lantern.

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Ancient Hoi An sits on the Thu Bon River. You can stroll along the river, watching fishermen at work, or catch a ferry to one of the nearby islands (like we did on our bike ride the day before).

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A local in his fishing boat

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The so-called ferry

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An example of the beautiful lanterns seen around town

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An ancient temple

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Boats parked on the Thu Bon River

There are also many markets throughout the day selling everything from fruits and vegetables, to shoes, to clothing, to trinkets. Honestly, I was more interested in taking pictures of people than buying anything.

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One of my favorite pictures. If I worked in a market in Vietnam, I’m fairly certain this would be me.

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A vendor transporting his merchandise

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Something to consider: The food market smelled something awful. I could not move on fast enough.

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One of my favorite things was photographing the Vietnamese people, from the very young to the very old. Surprisingly, the locals were amenable to my constant snapping. Parents didn’t mind at all when I snapped pictures of their children, and the children loved seeing themselves on the screen.

I also tried something new on this trip. I brought my 50mm f/1.8 lens which is ideal for portrait photography. It’s super light and only about $100 if you’re looking to try you’re hand at people photography. The annoying bit is constantly changing lenses as I walked about town, but I did notice a difference. The low aperture allowed me to shoot in lower-light situations and narrow the depth of field.

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This kid was amazing. He came up with this pose on his own. What a cutie.

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A classic Vietnamese scene.

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In short, Hoi An was amazing. Do. Not. Skip. Hoi An.

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